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Green "Nubby" Fabric

Updated: 2 days ago

Anyone else remember what I call "nubby" fabric? It was on a lot of furniture in the 1950s and 1960s. Most of the furniture in my parent's and grandparent's home had this fabric on it when I was growing up. It was kind of scratchy on your skin making it really uncomfortable, yet in a bizarre way it makes me nostalgic and it feels like home. Weird, right?


Well this little bench had green nubby fabric on it. As nostalgic as it is, it wasn't likely to sell in this condition.

I removed the seat and noticed the legs were coming apart.

This is a simple fix. All it requires is wood glue and a wood clamp. I coated the pegs with wood glue and inserted them back into the holes. I clamped each one with wood clamps and let it sit for a couple of days to dry.

I used Rustoleum Milk Paint in the Eclipse color. It took two coats to cover this piece adequately.

After it dried for 24 hours, I used 60 grit sandpaper to distress the piece. I used it all over the entire piece. I used a soft brush to remove the dust from the sandpaper. To finish the base I used Varathane Crystal Clear polyurethane in the Satin finish. to seal the paint.

Now I turned my attention to reupholstering the seat. I removed all of the old fabric and foam. I wanted to use the black and cream striped fabric on the seat.

I cut a piece of 1" foam. The foam is cut the same size as the board. I buy the foam in rolls, usually from Amazon, WalMart or Hobby Lobby. The foam comes in a variety of sizes. I use the 1" and 2" in the majority of my projects. I also cut a piece of batting, which I also buy in rolls. The batting is cut about 2" larger (all the way around) than the board. The fabric is cut about 3" larger all the way around the board.



The batting and the fabric should extend past the board so it can wrap around the sides of the seat to the underside.

Ensure the fabric is aligned to the desired outcome. For example, this fabric has stripes, so I definitely want it to be straight on the seat and I wanted the stripes to end in the same manner on the sides (note that the black stripes are wrapping around on the side of the bench. You wouldn't want a cream stripe on one end and a black stripe on the other.


Begin the upholstery by tacking the fabric in the center on each side. I always turn the fabric under along the edge. I just like a cleaner edge, but that is user preference! Tacking in the center allows you to flip it over, make sure everything it aligned. This is the point you can take a staple or two out if needed and realign.

I usually flip it over and make sure everything is aligned and that the fabric is taut.

Once you are certain the fabric is straight, begin stapling from the center of the board outward. I usually do a staple on either side of the center on each side and work my way out to the corners.



I continually flip it over and ensure the fabric is straight and taut.


As you reach the corner, trim away excess fabric and batting. The corner can tend to get bulky since there is fabric and batting on both sides of the corner. Fold down the fabric and secure it with staples.

This is how the finished seat will look. I decided I wanted to add one feature...



A tufted button! For a tutorial on how to cover a button and add it to you upholstery project, click here.

I screwed the seat back on the base and it was complete!

Now this is a cute little bench perfect for a farmhouse style! It could tuck into a corner for extra seating. It could be used as a seat for a vanity bench or it could be used in an entryway as a place to sit down and put on or remove your shoes. The nubby fabric is gone, but I don't think it will be missed!



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Below are some links to products I used in this project. Disclaimer: Junk is My Life is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.



Below is an image to pin to Pinterest if you would like to save this idea!






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Whether my junk is from a garage sale, estate or farm auction, flea market or the side of the road, I love to find it, fix it, clean it, sell it or keep it. So come along the backroads of Indiana with Junk is My Life (me), let's find something vintage and do something cool with it! Formerly Junk Journal.